Tag Archives: estate pipes

Refreshing A Cassano

One of the last few from the lot I picked up a few weeks ago. Cassano a brand I’m unfamiliar with, from what I could find it has mixed reviews, some consider it an under rated brand and others think its a poor quality make. Having not puffed the pipe myself I can only go by what I see before me and to be honest it looks to be a well made pipe, thick walls, proper drilling and a nice overall finish. To find a larger pipe at a price that won’t brake the bank is a rarity these days, so for a few bucks ( $60-$80 New  )I think you’d have an enjoyable smoking and looking pipe. Pipedia has a bit of history on the brand Cassano.

The Refresh.

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The pipe was in beautiful shape when I received it, very lightly smoked, smoked once I’d say and not to the bottom bowl. The chamber still has its bowl coating and the stem is free of chatter ( rubber bits always help ). The nomenclature is crisp but the stem logo has been partially buffed off, like many of the other pipes in this lot. It would seem there is a mad buffer out there, not only do they use a very firm hand when buffing but they also like there carnauba as well, bucket loads were used to buff these pipes.

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I cleaned the internals of the stummel and stem with EverClear, soft pipe cleaners and Q-Tips. Cleaning until my finial pipe cleaner came out as it went in.

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The stem was in great condition with the exception of a few bubbles on the button that would be easily corrected with a bit of sanding. I ran the button through the various grits of micro-mesh to remove the imperfections. The damage done to the stem logo was irreversible it was buffed flush with the stem surface, not leaving an indentation to be refilled. The rest of the stem would just need a buff and shine to bring back its luster.

Complete.

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Finished up on the wheel with a few coats carnauba and a micro-fiber hand buff, buffing the stem with blue compound and carnauba.

Thanks For Dropping In

Tim.

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Savinelli SherWood Rock Briar 504

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One more from the lot. Savinelli one of my favorite brands, beautiful pipes, that smoke great and at a price an average Joe can afford. I have quite a few in my collection, from my more expensive Autograph 4 to my less expensive Trevi each one preforms wonderfully.

The Restoration.

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The pipe had a few issues, oxidation, chatter and the stem logo was buffed clean off. The edge of the rim towards the shank was sanded or buffed down unevenly compared to the rest of the rim. A ton of carnauba wax was used and caked in every nook and cranny. On the plus side the nomenclature is crisp and the pipe seemed pretty clean.

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The use of both the PipNet and the CastleFord reamer would be used once again to ream back the cake in this smaller chambered pipe.

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Next I cleaned the internals of the stem and stummel with EverClear,  stiff/soft pipe cleaners, Q-Tips and makeup pads, cleaning until my final pipe cleaner came out as it went in. The internals were surprisingly clean.

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The stummel was over waxed, every crevice was caked in the stuff. Using Method Wood For Good Polish, a children’s toothbrush and a straight pin I began to remove the excess wax.

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I removed the little build up on the rim with Method and a Q-Tip. The rim was uneven, it looked as if the previous owner tried to remove a rim burn and left it unfinished. To even things out I sanded the higher portions of the rim with 400, 800 and 1000 grit sandpaper until I had a uniformed shape. I re-stained the rim with a light brown touch-up marker and removed the excess with a alcohol dampened rag.

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The stem was heavily oxidized, I applied a generous amount of non-bleach Soft Scrub and left it aside to penetrate the oxidation. Once the Soft Scrub turns from white to a brownish color its time to scrub vigorously with a rag until the oxidation is removed, adding more Soft Scrub as needed. Holding the stem under natural light will help to see if all oxidation was removed. I tried heat to remove some of the deep tooth impressions using a Bic lighter (moving the flame at all times never leaving it in one spot to long) a few raised but a couple of stubborn deeper impressions would need filling.

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I mixed thick black CA glue and charcoal powder together to fill in the deep impressions hitting it with accelerator to set the patch, I left it overnight to cure. The following morning I taped off the bit/lip area so my more abrasive sanding would remain in one area. I sanded with 400, 800 and 1000 grit sandpaper to blend the repair.

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I now ran the stem though the various grits of micro-mesh pads.

Complete.

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I finished up on the wheel with white diamond, a few coats carnauba and a micro-fiber hand buff. Buffing the stem with blue compound and carnauba.

Thanks For Taking A Look.

Tim.

Peterson – Donegal Rocky 264

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My latest estate lot had quite a few goodies and I found myself totally engulfed in my work, pipe after pipe, only pausing to take photos of my process. The next subject to hit my work desk, a Peterson Donegal Rocky 264. A more petite Pete then I would typically collect but I’ve always had a soft spot for the Donegal Rocky series. I have a new found respect for the Lovat shape, a mini version of the Canadian shape that I so love.

The Restoration  

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Lightly smoked like many of the pipes in this lot, the chamber was free of any real build up and its silver band was tarnished. A little oxidation was present, as well as some light chatter, the Peterson’s “P” logo was present and accounted for, it seems it did not meet its demise as its counterparts did in this lot.

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I tag-teamed the chamber with my PipNet and Castle Ford reamer, taking what little cake there was back to a suitable level. I then cleaned the internals with EverClear, stiff/soft pipe cleaners, makeup pads and Q-Tips, cleaning until my final pipe cleaner came out as it went in.

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I gave the stummel and silver band a wipe down with Method Wood For Good Polish with a rag to remove the oils, dirt and debris. I left it aside to dry.

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While the stummel dried I mixed Fiebing’s red and dark brown leather dye together, more red then brown and added a little EverClear to lighten the stain.

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I applied a few coats of the stain with a brush and hit it with a Bic lighter to set the stain, removing the excess stain with an alcohol dampened rag.

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After cleaning the silver band it was dull and had a few faint surface scratches. I taped off the shank with blue painters tape and buffed the band with tripoli, bringing back its shine.

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I used caution when removing the oxidation from the stem, the “P” logo was in fine shape. Many of the pipe stem logos in this lot were buffed clean off or at least partially missing. I applied non-bleach Soft Scrub to the oxidized areas of the stem and let the Soft Scrub penetrate the oxidation. Once the Soft Scrub turned from white to a brownish color I scrubbed the area with a Q-Tip so not to disturb the logo. I usually use a rag to remove the oxidation but in fear of loosing the logo I went slow with a Q-Tip, I would have to repeat this a few times until all oxidation was removed.

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There was some light chatter at the bit/lip area of the stem I used 400, 800 and 1000 grit sandpaper to remove the chatter. I then ran the stem though the various grits of micro-mesh.

Complete

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 Finished up on the wheel with white diamond, a few coats carnauba and a micro-fiber hand buff. Buffing the stem with blue compound and carnauba.

Thanks For Stopping In

Tim.

 

Quick Clean Up- Stanwell Night & Day 232

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My most recent purchase. A few caught my eye right off the bat, Peterson Donegal Rocky 999 and 264, Savinelli Alligator, Roma and Sherwood Rock Briar, Jobey Asti and a Stanwell Night & Day. All in very nice lightly smoked condition, rubber bits protecting most of the stems. I was happy with the lot from the start but the seller sweetened the deal even more by throwing in a few surprise extras, two pipe cases, pipe cleaners, a chrome stand and tobacco. I started with the Stanwell I liked the shape and it was hardly touched, I knew I’d have time to clean her up quick in between the few things I had going on today. 

The Refresh.    

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Smoked once, maybe twice.She was in like new condition, the carbon bowl coating was still in place, not a single tooth mark on the stem and the internals were spotless. There was a weird oil or grease on the stummel that left my fingers slippery .

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I cleaned the internals of the stummel and stem with EverClear Q-Tips, soft/stiff pipe cleaners and a makeup pad to wipe down the stems exterior.I gave the stummel a good wipe down with Method Wood For Good Polish to remove the oily residue. This was by far the quickest clear up I’ve done aside from maintaining my own rotation.

Spic & Span

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Finished up on the wheel with white diamond, a few coats carnauba and micro-fiber hand buff. Buffing the stem with blue compound and carnauba

Thanks For Dropping By.

Tim.

Forgotten Meer

Meerschaum.

A soft white clay like material consisting of hydrated magnesium silicate, found chiefly in Turkey.

 

To be honest Meerschaum freaks me out,  far too many do’s and don’ts and fragile, I guess I’m a little clumsy and briar is far more resilient. I’ve redone a couple in the past but always let them go, this unmarked Meer I received a year ago in a lot and forgot all about it until I was digging in my tobacco drawer for a new tin and stumbled across its case. I’m amazed by the skill used to carve these intricate pieces and many are unsigned, the carver never gets credit for there time and effort. I’ve always enjoyed seeing a well colored Meer, I’ll hang on to this one and see how she turns out.

The Restoration.

 

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The pipe was in decent shape, a few shallow scratches and light rim build up. The stummel was in sold condition free of cracks and the chamber was free of cake. The stem was the biggest issue, plugged shut with tars and oils, the threaded tenon was seized in place and the bit was chewed and chipped.

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To fee the threaded tenon I dripped a little EverClear around the tenon and left it to sit, after twenty minutes I was able to free it from the stem. I cleaned the internals of the stem and stummel with EverClear, Q-Tips and soft pipe cleaners, cleaning until the pipe clears came out clean. I cleaned the rim with Method Good For Wood Polish removing the build up of tars and oils.

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The lip/bit was chewed, cracked and chipped. The stem being lucite made things a bit more difficult to repair the missing piece of the button. I mixed thick black CA glue and a little charcoal powder and applied it to the lip/bit area with a toothpick hitting with accelerator to set the patch. The patch wouldn’t be transparent but the repair would be stronger then using Gorilla glue.

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I left the stem to sit overnight to allow the patch to cure, the next morning I reshaped the button with needle files and 400, 800 and 1000 grit sandpaper.

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With the new button formed I ran the stem though the various grits of micro-mesh.

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In the end the patch blended pretty well.

Complete.

 

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I gave the stummel a wipe down with Howard’s Butcher Block Conditioner and hand buffed off the excess. I lightly buffed the stem at a low rpm with blue compound, a few coats of carnauba and a micro-fiber hand buffing.

Thanks For Taking A Look

Tim.

Quick Clean Up of 2 Petersons

Peterson.

Donegal Rocky XL90 & Standard XL305

 

Its always nice to add a couple more Petes to the collection and in decent condition to boot. I enjoy a challenge as much as the next guy but its also nice to do a leisurely standard cleaning.

The Clean Up.

 

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 For the price they were both in great lightly smoked condition. A little oxidation , chatter and the silver band on the Donegal was tarnished.

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I started with my PipNet reamer and reamed back the cake to a suitable thickness. The Donegal chamber was perfect, still had the bowl coating. The 315 was a little different the bowl coating was still there but there was an indentation on the side of the chamber that was caused by careless reaming in the past. I sanded the area to smooth out the damage as much as possible, in the long run it will not affect the smoke .

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Next I cleaned the internals with EverClear stiff/soft pipe cleaners and Q-Tips. Very clean internals on both pipes, if you were to judge the pipes by there mortise alone you’d think they were un-smoked.

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With the internals clean I now gave the stummals a wipe down with Method Wood For Good Polish and found a new use for the polish in the process it also cleans the tarnish from  silver bands. I’m amazed by this stuff more and more each time I use it.

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Before removing the oxidation I tried a little heat to remove some of the chatter. ( holding the stem above the flame of a Bic Lighter moving the flame at all times so not to burn the stem)  Both stems responded pretty well, the XL90 responded the best leaving only minimal marks, the 305’s upper side was left with very little chatter after the heat , the under side  didn’t respond as well and would still need sanding,

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With the bulk of the chatter removed I moved onto the oxidation, I applied a generous amount  of non-bleach Soft Scrub and left it aside to allow the Soft Scrub to brake up the oxidation, once the Soft Scrub turns from white to a brownish color its time to scrub vigorously with a rag adding more Soft Scrub as needed. ( Holding the stem under natural light will help to see if all oxidation has been removed)

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I now ran the stems thought the various grits of micro-mesh. The XL90 didn’t need much attention but the 305 needed a bit more work, I taped off the bit end with blue painters tape so my more abrasive sanding would remain in one area. I sanded with 400,800 and 1000 grit sandpaper wet to remove the rest of the chatter I then ran it though the micro-mesh pads.

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During my process of removing the oxidation I also inadvertently removed the P from the XL90 stem , I taped off the P originally but the tape was no match for the Soft Scrub. My white Rub’n Buff dried up so gold would have to do, using a toothpick I applied the Rub’n Buff and allowed it to dry, I then lightly polished with 8000 and 12000 micro-mesh pads.

Complete.

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I finished up on the wheel with a few coats of carnauba and micro-fiber hand buffing. Buffing the stem with blue compound and carnauba.

Thanks For Taking A look.

Tim.

The Tinder Box (Canadian)

The Tinder Box

I received this Tinder Box a few months back and wasn’t sure what way to go with it. The shape is one I have become accustomed to but this particular pipe was covered in pink putty. I originally attempted to fill the pits with Gorilla glue and briar dust but I wasn’t happy with the results. I played around with a few different rustication’s and finally found one I was happy with. 

 

The Restoration

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Other then the fills the pipe was in lightly smoked condition. A little rim build up , oxidation and chatter.

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I reamed back the cake to a suitable thickness with my PipNet reamer. The chamber was free of any defects.

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Next I moved on to the internals cleaning with EverClear , stiff/soft pipe cleaners , Q-Tips and makeup pads. Cleaning until the final pipe cleaner came out as it went in.

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I removed the rim build-up using Method Wood For Good Polish, I applied a generous  amount to the rim and allowed it to penetrate  the build-up. Once the build-up softens its easily removed with makeup pads and Q-Tips. Once the rim was free of debris I could see  more of the dreaded pink filler, this helped in my decision making and rustication would be more appealing and easier then filling multiple fills.

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Next the stem oxidation removal, I applied a generous amount of non-bleach Soft Scrub and allowed it to sit so the Soft Scrub could penetrate the oxidation. Once the Soft Scrub turns from white to a brownish color its time to scrub vigorously with a rag until the oxidation has been removed , adding more Soft Scrub as needed. Holding the stem under natural light will help to see if all oxidation has been removed.

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With the oxidation removed from the stem and the chatter waiting to be addressed , I moved onto the stummel and the rustication. I tried a few different methods before finding what I liked . Using a burr bit set I began to carve the briar with a medium round burr working in different directions overlapping my previous pass. I used a diluted stain mix , a few drops of Fiebing’s dark brown dye and 10 ml of EverClear applying it with a brush hitting it with a Bic lighter in between coats, removing the excess stain with an EverClear dampened rag. Before hitting the wheel I applied Howard’s butcher block conditioner and left it for an hour to penetrate, removing the excess with a clean rag. I added a silver band not for repair purposes but for cosmetic, I’m usually stingy with my bands but in this case it was more aesthetically pleasing.

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With the stummel complete and waiting for the buffer, I could now finish the stem. I started with the chatter at the bit end , using 800, 1000 and 1500 grit sandpaper wet, then running though the various grits of micro-mesh pads. I use thin clear plastic as a shaft/stem divider. Like the kind found in the windows of children’s toy packaging.

Complete.

 

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I finished up on the wheel with a few coats carnauba and a micro fiber hand buffing. Buffing the stem with blue compound and carnauba.

Thanks For Taking A Look.

Tim.

Lorenzo – Not A Typical Restoration

Lorenzo Firenze Monterosa

Lorenzo pipes I’ve always been a fan of there shapes and thick walls but not so much with the use of filler a little overboard in the putty department. In the past pipes with an overwhelming amount of filler or to beat up to save the shape I’ve opted to rusticate instead of sanding and filling. I had a few in my collection but recently gave one away to my father, so when I received this thick walled Lorenzon I knew it was a prime candidate to be carved and rusticated. Its been a few years since I’ve rusticated a pipe and I couldn’t wait to get into it..

The Restoration.

 

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The pipe was in poor condition when received , it appeared the previous owner attempted to band the cracked shank or removed an existing band. The shank was cracked in multiple areas straight though to the mortise. The shank was sanded leaving an uneven fit between shank and stem. The stem had tooth impressions, oxidation and the button was chewed. The chamber was thick with crumbling cake and rim tar and char. The stummel had quite a few large fills.

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I started with the chamber reaming back the cake to a suitable thickness. The odd shaped chamber led me to use both the Pipnet and Castleford reamers. Starting with the smallest attachments and working up to the largest the chamber would accept.

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With the chamber reamed I now concentrated on the caked rim. I applied a generous amount of Method Wood For Good Polish with a Q-Tip to the rim and left it upside down on a makeup pad to allow the polish to penetrate the build-up, once the build-up is softened it is easily removed with a makeup pad and Q-Tips.

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I now worked the stem/shank portion , sanding the stem/shank flush , the nomenclature due to my sanding and the previous owners sanding was almost nonexistent.

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I now banded the cracked shank with a wide band, I worked the band part way on then heated the band with my Wagner’s heat gun and pressed the band into place using the banding tool..

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I cleaned the internals using EverClear, stiff/soft pipe cleaners and shank brushes, cleaning until the final pipe cleaner came out as it went in.

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I decided to rusticate the stummel instead of filling multiple large fills. In the past I have craved stummels on less desirable pipes or pipes that are too far damaged . I drew out the pattern to be carved on the stummel and using a rotary burr set I carved the stummel, the thick walls of the Lorenzo pipe allowed me to go deeper into the briar.

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Before staining the stummel I sanded the smooth areas with 400,800 and 1000 grit sandpaper. Using Fiebing’s Leather dye I stained the stummel. I mixed black Fiebing’s with a little EverClear and applied it to the rusticated area of the stummel using a Q-Tip. Finally I mixed red Fiebing’s with a little EverClear and applied it to the smooth area of the stummel, I now left it for a few hours to dry, I removed the excess stain with an EverClear dampened rag.

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With the stummel ready to hit the wheel I moved onto the stem. I applied a generous amount of non-bleach Soft Scrub to the stem and left it aside to penetrate the oxidation. Once the Soft Scrub turns from white to a brownish color is time to scrub vigorously with a rag adding more Soft Scrub as needed. Holding the stem under natural light will help to see if all oxidation was removed.

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After cleaning the stem I worked on the chewed button and tooth impressions, I removed some of the shallow impressions with a flat sided needle file , the deeper impressions would need filling. I rough sanded the area of repair with 400 grit sandpaper wiping down with an EverClear dampened rag. I filled the impressions with thick black CA glue and allowed to dry. I mixed thick black CA glue and charcoal powder together to form a paste to rebuild the button, applying the paste with a toothpick to the button and hitting it with accelerator to set ,I left it over night to cure. Using needle files and sandpaper I reformed the button .

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After banding the shank the stem / shank fit was off leaving a small gap between stem and shank. Using a small block of wood drilled to fit the tenon loosely , I lightly sanded the stem flat. I was able close the gap but not completely , the draw is air tight but if held up to the light you can still see a small gap.

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I now ran the stem thought the various grits of sandpaper and micro-mesh pads. Sanding the stem with 800, 1000 and 1500 grit sandpaper wet and micro-mesh 1500-3200 wet and 3600- 12000 dry.

Complete.

 

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I finished up on the wheel with white diamond , a few coats of carnauba and a micro-fiber hand buffing. Buffing the stem with blue compound and carnauba.

Thanks For Taking A Look.

Tim.

 

A Pipe For Poppy.

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Custombilt Oom Paul.

My daughter lovingly calls my father Poppy they have been inseparable since her birth 11 years ago , my fathers pretty incredible ,give ya the shirt off his back, drop everything to help in anyway and give ya his last dime if you needed it. Almost a year ago we had a scare, while hanging out at our house Dad suffered a mini-stroke. Doctors said it wasn’t as severe as other strokes but nevertheless it scared the hell out of all of us. It took him sometime to get back to the way he was before. Now doctors say hes as healthy as a horse ,so he has decided to take up the pipe once again after a thirty year hiatus. He picked a pipe from the wall to start with a bent Grabow with a spoon stinger , one of the first if not the first pipe I had redone years ago. I then told him I would like to redo a Custombilt that was similar to a Tom Howard he had liked. So that brings me to A Pipe For Poppy , a Wally Frank era Bilt Oom Paul. Shes been in the to do rack going on three years I would start but lose interest and put her back but now I had a reason to complete it. I gave him the pipe yesterday and his eyes lit up, needless to say he was very happy with finished pipe.

The Restoration.

 

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The pipe had been started and stopped a few times since I received it, so the reaming and internal cleaning had already been done previously. The chamber was free of pitting, there were a few tooth impressions and oxidation on the stem.The previous owner had carved a P into the bottom of the stummel. The pipe is for my farther and my daughter calls him poppy so the P is fitting but too tacky for my taste.

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My attention was drawn first to the P caved in the bottom of the stummel,  luckily it wasn’t to deep. Starting with 220 grit sandpaper I removed the bulk of the self carving, then moving to 400, 800 and finished with 1000 grit sandpaper.

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I lightly sanded the stummel with 800 grit sandpaper then gave the stummel a wipe down with an EverClear soaked rag to remove the fine sanding dust.

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Before hitting the buffer I applied a coat of Howard’s Butcher Block Conditioner , I applied using a Q-Tip then leaving it aside to penetrate, removing the excess with a clean rag.

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I applied a generous amount of non-bleach Soft Scrub to the stem and  left it aside for the Soft Scrub to soften the oxidation. Once the Soft Scrub turns from white to brownish color its time to scrub vigorously adding more Soft Scrub as needed until all oxidation has been removed, holding the stem under natural light will help to see if all oxidation has been removed.

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With the oxidation removed I focused on the tooth impressions , the rest of the stem was in good shape so I taped off the bit/lip area of work with blue painters tape so my sanding would remain in this area. I removed the deeper impressions with a flat sided needle file. I removed the rough file marks with 400,800 and 1000 sandpaper wet.

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I now ran the stem though the various grits of micro-mesh 1500-2500 wet and 3200-12000 dry ,polishing to a shine.

Complete.

20160525202327~220160525202354~220160525202422~220160525202443~220160525202452~220160525202507~2 I finished up on the wheel with white diamond , carnauba and a micro-fiber hand buffing. Buffing the stem with blue compound and carnauba.

I’m looking forward to the first smoke.

Thanks for everything Dad.

Thanks For Taking A Look.

Tim-

  

Karl Erik

Karl Erik.

My free hand pipes can be counted on one hand , I’m not the biggest fan but once and a while one catches my eye .Erik Nording, Preben Holm, Ben Wade, Karl Erik Ottendahl and W.O. Larsen pipes are a few I keep an eye out for but they have to be the right shape and preferably smooth , so as luck would have it I found just that a Karl Erik and at a price I couldn’t refuse thirteen bucks. Now for thirteen bucks your not getting mint condition , some work would be involved . The stamping reads Karl Erik over Hand Cut In Denmark and below that the number 5. I’ve read the grading of his pipes but was unable to find the use of the number 5. To my eye the pipe is flawless not an ounce of filler. The stem on the other hand may not be original to the pipe there are no markings of any kind but I have also seen a few examples considered original without the KE stamped on the stem .

The Restoration.

 

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The cracked stummal was the biggest issue , I couldn’t tell from the auction photos how deep or how far the crack had run. Once the pipe itself was in my hands I was happy to see it was a stress crack  and not due to a drop. As the briar dried it twisted and formed the crack. The stem was worn , oxidized and the lip was nonexistent. The rest of the pipe was in decent shape.

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A few years ago my wife had picked up a couple of stem blanks on clearance from Pipe Smokers Emporium , I decided to re-stem the pipe and save the original stem to work on later. Using the Pimo tenon turning tool I cut down the tenon until it almost fit the mortise finishing with 400 grit sandpaper to get the snug fit required . I now taped off the tenon with painters tape and tightened the tenon in my mounted drills chuck. I set the drill to auto run and began to shape the stem with wood carving chisels.

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I cleaned up the rough edges with a needle file and rounded some of the sharp corners with 1000 grit sandpaper.

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Using a sanding drum mounted in my drill I began to shape the stem , once I had the basic shape I was looking for I sanded the stem with 150, 220, 400 and 800 grit sandpaper.

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Before the final sanding and polishing I put a bend in the stem using my Wagner heat gun and bending it over a pill bottle.

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With the bend in the stem I could now run the stem through the various grits of micro-mesh 1500-2400 wet and 3200-12000 dry.

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With the stem complete I could now focus on the stummel, Using my PipNet reamer starting from smallest to largest I reamed back the cake to a suitable thickness.

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I now cleaned the internals using EverClear , shank brushes , Q-Tips and stiff/soft pipe cleaners , cleaning until my final pipe cleaner came out as it went in.

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Now to address the cracked stummel, I cleaned the area with an EverClear dipped Q-Tip and removed the embedded debris with a X-Acto knife.

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Using a jewelers loop I looked carefully for each end of the crack. One end started just at the top of the shank and the other end of the crack ended at the bottom front of the stummel. Using a 1/16 drill bit I drilled a shallow hole at each end of the crack, to prevent it from cracking any further.

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I then filled the crack and holes I drilled with Gorilla Glue and briar dust.

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I sanded the area of repair first with 220 grit sandpaper, it seems I should start with a less abrasive grit but the crack was raised at one side due to the twisting as the briar dried. Once the cracked area was sanded flush with 220 grit sandpaper I moved to 400, 800 and finally 1000. At this time I lightly sanded the entire stummel with 1000 grit sandpaper then wiping down the stummel with an EverClear dampened rag to remove the fine sanding dust.

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I now mixed dark brown Fiebings leather dye with EverClear to lighten it a bit. I coated the stummel with a few coats of the dye hitting it with a Bic lighter to set the stain. The stummel was substantially darker then it was when originally received but in order to hide the repair it would in turn need to be darker. I removed the excess stain with an EverClear dampened rag.

Complete.

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I finished up on the wheel with white diamond , carnauba and a micro-fiber hand buff. Buffing the stem with carnauba.

Thanks For Taking A Look.

Tim.