Tag Archives: tobacco pipe

A Pipe For Poppy.

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Custombilt Oom Paul.

My daughter lovingly calls my father Poppy they have been inseparable since her birth 11 years ago , my fathers pretty incredible ,give ya the shirt off his back, drop everything to help in anyway and give ya his last dime if you needed it. Almost a year ago we had a scare, while hanging out at our house Dad suffered a mini-stroke. Doctors said it wasn’t as severe as other strokes but nevertheless it scared the hell out of all of us. It took him sometime to get back to the way he was before. Now doctors say hes as healthy as a horse ,so he has decided to take up the pipe once again after a thirty year hiatus. He picked a pipe from the wall to start with a bent Grabow with a spoon stinger , one of the first if not the first pipe I had redone years ago. I then told him I would like to redo a Custombilt that was similar to a Tom Howard he had liked. So that brings me to A Pipe For Poppy , a Wally Frank era Bilt Oom Paul. Shes been in the to do rack going on three years I would start but lose interest and put her back but now I had a reason to complete it. I gave him the pipe yesterday and his eyes lit up, needless to say he was very happy with finished pipe.

The Restoration.

 

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The pipe had been started and stopped a few times since I received it, so the reaming and internal cleaning had already been done previously. The chamber was free of pitting, there were a few tooth impressions and oxidation on the stem.The previous owner had carved a P into the bottom of the stummel. The pipe is for my farther and my daughter calls him poppy so the P is fitting but too tacky for my taste.

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My attention was drawn first to the P caved in the bottom of the stummel,  luckily it wasn’t to deep. Starting with 220 grit sandpaper I removed the bulk of the self carving, then moving to 400, 800 and finished with 1000 grit sandpaper.

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I lightly sanded the stummel with 800 grit sandpaper then gave the stummel a wipe down with an EverClear soaked rag to remove the fine sanding dust.

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Before hitting the buffer I applied a coat of Howard’s Butcher Block Conditioner , I applied using a Q-Tip then leaving it aside to penetrate, removing the excess with a clean rag.

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I applied a generous amount of non-bleach Soft Scrub to the stem and  left it aside for the Soft Scrub to soften the oxidation. Once the Soft Scrub turns from white to brownish color its time to scrub vigorously adding more Soft Scrub as needed until all oxidation has been removed, holding the stem under natural light will help to see if all oxidation has been removed.

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With the oxidation removed I focused on the tooth impressions , the rest of the stem was in good shape so I taped off the bit/lip area of work with blue painters tape so my sanding would remain in this area. I removed the deeper impressions with a flat sided needle file. I removed the rough file marks with 400,800 and 1000 sandpaper wet.

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I now ran the stem though the various grits of micro-mesh 1500-2500 wet and 3200-12000 dry ,polishing to a shine.

Complete.

20160525202327~220160525202354~220160525202422~220160525202443~220160525202452~220160525202507~2 I finished up on the wheel with white diamond , carnauba and a micro-fiber hand buffing. Buffing the stem with blue compound and carnauba.

I’m looking forward to the first smoke.

Thanks for everything Dad.

Thanks For Taking A Look.

Tim-

  

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Karl Erik

Karl Erik.

My free hand pipes can be counted on one hand , I’m not the biggest fan but once and a while one catches my eye .Erik Nording, Preben Holm, Ben Wade, Karl Erik Ottendahl and W.O. Larsen pipes are a few I keep an eye out for but they have to be the right shape and preferably smooth , so as luck would have it I found just that a Karl Erik and at a price I couldn’t refuse thirteen bucks. Now for thirteen bucks your not getting mint condition , some work would be involved . The stamping reads Karl Erik over Hand Cut In Denmark and below that the number 5. I’ve read the grading of his pipes but was unable to find the use of the number 5. To my eye the pipe is flawless not an ounce of filler. The stem on the other hand may not be original to the pipe there are no markings of any kind but I have also seen a few examples considered original without the KE stamped on the stem .

The Restoration.

 

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The cracked stummal was the biggest issue , I couldn’t tell from the auction photos how deep or how far the crack had run. Once the pipe itself was in my hands I was happy to see it was a stress crack  and not due to a drop. As the briar dried it twisted and formed the crack. The stem was worn , oxidized and the lip was nonexistent. The rest of the pipe was in decent shape.

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A few years ago my wife had picked up a couple of stem blanks on clearance from Pipe Smokers Emporium , I decided to re-stem the pipe and save the original stem to work on later. Using the Pimo tenon turning tool I cut down the tenon until it almost fit the mortise finishing with 400 grit sandpaper to get the snug fit required . I now taped off the tenon with painters tape and tightened the tenon in my mounted drills chuck. I set the drill to auto run and began to shape the stem with wood carving chisels.

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I cleaned up the rough edges with a needle file and rounded some of the sharp corners with 1000 grit sandpaper.

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Using a sanding drum mounted in my drill I began to shape the stem , once I had the basic shape I was looking for I sanded the stem with 150, 220, 400 and 800 grit sandpaper.

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Before the final sanding and polishing I put a bend in the stem using my Wagner heat gun and bending it over a pill bottle.

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With the bend in the stem I could now run the stem through the various grits of micro-mesh 1500-2400 wet and 3200-12000 dry.

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With the stem complete I could now focus on the stummel, Using my PipNet reamer starting from smallest to largest I reamed back the cake to a suitable thickness.

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I now cleaned the internals using EverClear , shank brushes , Q-Tips and stiff/soft pipe cleaners , cleaning until my final pipe cleaner came out as it went in.

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Now to address the cracked stummel, I cleaned the area with an EverClear dipped Q-Tip and removed the embedded debris with a X-Acto knife.

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Using a jewelers loop I looked carefully for each end of the crack. One end started just at the top of the shank and the other end of the crack ended at the bottom front of the stummel. Using a 1/16 drill bit I drilled a shallow hole at each end of the crack, to prevent it from cracking any further.

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I then filled the crack and holes I drilled with Gorilla Glue and briar dust.

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I sanded the area of repair first with 220 grit sandpaper, it seems I should start with a less abrasive grit but the crack was raised at one side due to the twisting as the briar dried. Once the cracked area was sanded flush with 220 grit sandpaper I moved to 400, 800 and finally 1000. At this time I lightly sanded the entire stummel with 1000 grit sandpaper then wiping down the stummel with an EverClear dampened rag to remove the fine sanding dust.

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I now mixed dark brown Fiebings leather dye with EverClear to lighten it a bit. I coated the stummel with a few coats of the dye hitting it with a Bic lighter to set the stain. The stummel was substantially darker then it was when originally received but in order to hide the repair it would in turn need to be darker. I removed the excess stain with an EverClear dampened rag.

Complete.

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I finished up on the wheel with white diamond , carnauba and a micro-fiber hand buff. Buffing the stem with carnauba.

Thanks For Taking A Look.

Tim.

 

Jobey Shellmoor Pot

Jobey Shellmoor

This is second out of the lot of eleven I picked up sometime back. Jobey Pipes they’ve been around for a long time and changed hands a time or two for more info Pipedia they have the history in a click. I couldn’t lock down a precise year for this one but nevertheless shes a beaut, large chambered pot for along smoke, something I look for in a pipe . The pipe itself is stamped on the underside Jobey Shellmoor, Extra, Imported Briar and English Para on the stem.

The Restoration. 

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Upon inspection she was a solid pipe nothing too troubling, rim tar, thin cake, stem chatter, impressions, oxidation and this funky inner tube that looked as if someone tried to chew it off. The toughest part would be the inner tube it was glued or epoxied in place.

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Starting with my Pipnet reamer and the smallest attachment I began reaming back the old  cake, working my way up to the largest attachment. The chamber was so large that the final attachment could not reach the inner walls, I finished up with 400 grit sandpaper to complete the chamber.

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Next I applied a generous amount of Method Wood For Good polish to the rim and left it upside down on a make-up pad and allowed the polish to penetrate the build-up. Once the polish softened the build-up it was removed with a children’s toothbrush and Q-Tips.At this time I gave the stummel a wipe down with Method polish, a rag and a children’s toothbrush to remove any debris in-bedded in the crags.

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 I cut off the end of the mangled inner tube with snips and using a 1/8 inch bit tightened in my drills chuck I hand turned the stem until all of the aluminium tube was removed.

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I gave the internals of the stummel and stem a good cleaning with EverClear, shank/mortise brushes, Q-Tips and stiff/soft pipe cleaners. Cleaning until the final pipe cleaner came out as it went in.

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Next I removed the oxidation from the stem using non-bleach Soft Scrub, I applied the Soft Scrub to the stem and left it aside so the Soft Scrub could penetrate the oxidation. Once the the Soft Scrub turns from white to a brownish color its time to scrub vigorously with a rag until the oxidation is removed, applying more Soft Scrub as needed, holding the stem under natural light will help to see if all oxidation was removed.

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The tooth impressions would need filling, I sanded the area of the indentations with 400 grit sandpaper and cleaned with an EverClear dampened rag to remove any sanding dust before filling. I mixed thick black CA glue and charcoal powder together to form a paste, then applying it to the impressions with a toothpick, hitting it with accelerator to set the patch. I left it overnight to cure. After allowing time to cure I removed the excess with needle files and sandpaper.

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 Before hitting the wheel I ran the stem though the various grits of micro-mesh pads.

Complete.

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I finished her up on the wheel with white diamond, a few coats of carnauba and micro-fiber hand buffing. Buffing the stem with blue compound and carnauba.

Thanks for taking a look.

Tim-

Scoundrels – John Bessai Pot

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Pipe Scoundrels Pipes.

Way back in February Clint of Pipes Scoundrels sent a huge package out of the blue . We had spoken a month or so before of a pipe that was in need of care but never figured out a plan. In the package a letter where he offered up a trade of sorts skill for skill, I love the barter system. In the package an incredible framed Pen & Ink work, that I watched though his blog come together. I was blown away by his skill and photos online. I had no idea it was coming my way, in person it was even more amazing, beautifully done. Also in the package a couple of Pipe Scoundrels stickers ( he has a killer logo) and three pipes in need of repair/cleaning. A couple John Bessai pipes one Canadian, one Pot and an Iwan Ries a unique shape I’m not familiar with. I was excited to get to work , this was the first time I was to work on someone else’s pipes but I got side tracked and side tracked again but finally I had some time to sit and finish, now the three are complete.

My plain was to write a little something on the history of Bessie pipes but as it has it some else has already done the work and a much better job then I would have. History of John Bessai (thanks to jguss from pipesmagazine forum) Classic Pipe Shops from years gone by in America – pipes and tobaccos and their influence, a well written and informative post. I will say the shop, The John Bessai Pipe Clinic was run between 1909-1993 at 35 Colonial Arcade in Cleveland Ohio.

The Restoration. 

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She was in need of help, an ill fitting replacement stem that was oxidized and had a couple of impressions, chunky crumbling cake, a few fills and a rim that was smacked around a bit, but I’m not afraid of a little work.

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Starting with the stummel  and my PipNet reamer I removed the old cake and took the chamber back to briar. The chamber was in descent shape aside from a small burn/defect at the top of the draught hole, I will address this a little further down.

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I cleaned up the rim with Method Good For Wood Polish and could now see the damaged rim better. The photo is poor but the top of the chamber/rim was reamed in the past with what I’m guessing  was a pocket knife, the edges of the rim were nicked up and missing small chunks of briar.

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Using needle files and sand paper I began to reshape the rim. First by topping the rim, I taped down 400 grit sand paper and topped the bowl. Next using needle files I reshaped the inner rim removing the file marks with 400 grit sandpaper. I finished the rim with 800 & 1000 grit sandpaper.

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Using EverClear I ran a retort to loosen up the old tars, oils and tobacco.

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I now gave the stummel and stem internals a good cleaning, using EverClear, shank brushes, mortise brush, Q-Tips, cotton-balls and stiff/soft pipe cleaners. I unrolled cotton-balls, twist them into a swab and turn them tightly into the mortise. I then add EverClear to the chamber and allow the swab to soak up the alcohol, I would repeat this process a few time until the swab comes out clean. I cleaned the stem and draught with stiff/soft pipe cleaners working until my final pipe cleaner comes out as it when in.

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There were a few dents on the stummel, using a household iron set to medium heat and a damp rag I would steam out the dents. By dampening the rag and covering the dents to be steamed out and placing the stummel to the heated iron, I would repeat this process a few times until I was satisfied all imperfections had risen .

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There were a few fills that stood out and would have to be removed. Using a X-Acto knife and Method Wood polish, to soften the fill, I removed the old brightly colored filler. I cleaned the area to be refilled with an alcohol dampened Q-Tip. I now filled the pits with briar dust and Gorilla Glue and allowed it to dry. Once the new fill had time to dry I sanded the areas first with 800 grit sandpaper and finishing with 1000 grit sandpaper.

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Now the stem, I applied a generous amount of non-bleach Soft Scrub, leaving it aside to allow the Soft Scrub to penetrate the oxidation. Once the Soft Scrub turns form white to a brownish color its time to scrub vigorously with a rag, scrubbing until all the oxidation has been removed. Holding the stem in natural light will allow you to see if all the oxidation was removed.

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Now the ill fitting replacement stem, the tenon fit snug but the stem and shank had a poor fit, the stem was a bit larger then the shank. Starting with 220 grit sandpaper I sanded down the stem until a uniform fit between shank and stem was achieved.At this time I removed any tooth impressions and sanded the entire stem and the end of the shank with 400 grit sandpaper. I went back in with a brown touch up stain marker and re-stained the shank and fill areas. At this time I took care of the missing chunk at the top of the draught, mixing ash with a little water to make pipe mud I filled the missing spot with the mud and allowed it to harden. I checked before sending it off to Clint and the repair was solid.

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The button had an odd indentation and was worn down.

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I mixed thick black CA glue and charcoal powder together to make a paste, using a toothpick I applied the paste to the button hitting it with accelerator to set the glue.

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Using needle files and sandpaper I began to shape a new button.

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Now I ran the stem thought the various girts of sandpaper and micro-mesh. Starting with 800 grit sandpaper wet, 1000 grit paper wet, 1500 grit paper wet, 1500 micro-mesh wet, 1800 mesh wet, 2000 grit sandpaper wet, 2400 mesh wet. Then the remaining micro-mesh pads dry 3200-12000.

Complete.

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I finished up on the wheel with white diamond, a few coats of carnauba and a micro-fiber hand buffing. Buffing the stem with blue compound and a few coats of carnauba.

Thanks again Clint the pipes were a pleasure to work on, a nice change from my Custombilt craze . 

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Thanks for taking a look.

Tim.

 

Peterson System Standard 306

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 This is the first of eleven pipes I recently acquired. The Peterson System Standard 306 is the first sitter in my small Peterson collection. I am unsure of its age as it does not have a made in or hallmarks, which I found odd as all my other Petes have some sort of way to date them. The only markings on the pipe is Peterson of Dublin System Standard 306 and K&P Peterson on the band.
As Received.

 

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Over all in pretty descent shape, the stem was oxidized and a few tooth impressions. The chamber had an uneven crumbling cake and the rim was built up with old tar/oils, there is also charring around the inside edge of the rim. The finnish was worn and tired and one small spot of filler. The biggest hurdle was the Lakeland ghost.

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I started with the stummel and my Pipnet Reamer. Starting with the smallest attachment and working up to the second largest, I brought the chamber back to briar, it was free of burn or pitting. I smoothed things out with 400 grit sandpaper wrapped around a finger .

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Next I could tackle the caked and charred rim. I applied a generous amount of Method Good For Wood Polish to the rim and set it aside to penetrate the build-up for a few minutes. Using Q-tips I removed the rim build-up, I would repeat this process a few times to remove all the debris. After the build-up was removed the rim darkening was still present, using worn micro-mesh I was able to fade most of the darker spots of the rim.

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Next I gave the internals a good cleaning. Using EverClear, shank brushes, Q-tips and stiff/soft pipe cleaners. Cleaning until the last pipe cleaner came out as it went in. I now filled the chamber and mortise with cotton balls and added EverClear until the cotton balls were saturated and set it aside for a few hours to absorb the tars and oils. The Lakeland ghost would not give up, the stummel was left over night  with EverClear and cotton balls and hopefully did the trick.

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My attention now turned to the oxidized stem. I applied non-bleach Soft Scrub to the stem with a children’s toothbrush and left it aside to penetrate the oxidation. Once the Soft Scrub turns from white to a brownish color its time to introduce the old elbow grease and scrub vigorously with a rag until the oxidation is removed. I finished up with a damp Magic Eraser to remove the leftover oxidation.

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With the oxidation removed I could begin removing the impressions at the bit. I tapped off the stem with blue painters tape just before the P-lip so my rough sanding would remain in one area, the rest of the stem would not need as abrasive grit. Starting with 400 grit sandpaper wet I removed the deep impressions, then working through 800, 1000 grit sandpaper wet, 1500, 1800 micro-mesh wet, 2000 grit sandpaper wet and finally 2400 micro-mesh wet until smooth. Before sanding with the finial six micro-mesh pads I removed the painters tape and dry sanded the entire stem 3200-12000.

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There was one small spot of filler that would need to be removed. To remove I used Method Good For Wood Polish, an X-ACTO knife and a Q-tip, I applied a small amount of the polish with a Q-tip to the filler and left it aside to soften up. Once softened I removed the filler with the X-ACTO knife, I then cleaned the area with a Q-tip and EverClear to remove any oils or debris. I filled the pit with Gorilla Glue and briar dust and allowed it to dry. Once dry I sanded the area with worn micro-mesh until the repair was flush.

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The rim and filler spot was left lighter after sanding with  the micro-mesh, using a touch up marker I  was able to blend the faded rim and filler spot into the rest of the finnish. Coloring in the rim and filler spot with the marker allowing to dry and removing the excess with an alcohol dampened rag. In the end I could not exserminate the Lakeland ghost completely but with smoking it will likely dissipate.

Complete.

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I finished up on the wheel with white diamond, a few coats of carnauba and a microfiber hand buffing. Buffing the stem with blue compound.

Thanks For Taking A Look.

Brebbia Clean Up

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Happy International Pipe Smoking Day to all my friends, readers and fellow bloggers. For the day I wanted something new, well new to me . She came in on Friday just in time for a Saturday puff. The Brebbia Fat Bob is a pipe I’ve been in search of in my price range for two year’s. Now I’m unsure if that’s what I have here but if it’s not it’s a close match. The pipe itself is unmarked but the stem has the Brebbia inlay. I have seen other unmarked Brebbia’s in the past made for private B&M’s.
As Received

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I got a little ahead of myself with this refurb and began working without stopping to take before and after photos, the photo above is from the auction. It was listed as clean and ready to smoke apparently my standard’s are a little higher than others. The pipe was badly reamed ( out of round ) and the chamber had the start of a burn out. The chamber and mortise were still holding tars and oils, the black finish was worn in spots. The stem on the other hand was spotless.

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The above two photos are of the rim and chamber burn. The right side of the rim was thicker then the left side and the chamber was reamed into an oblong shape. I had already begun removing the worn finish in my excitement starting with EverClear and then moving to acetone, I would normally ream the chamber first.

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The chamber was reamed by the seller for the most part back to briar exposing the burn in the right side of the chamber. I sanded the chamber instead of reaming with 220 grit sandpaper and then 400 grit sandpaper, sanding the right side of the chamber and removing the burnt area completely. There was more than enough chamber thickness to do so.

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Next I moved onto the uneven rim. Using a round side needle file and 220/400 grit sandpaper I began reshaping the rim.

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I decided the rim would pop more if it were smooth and natural, I sanded the rim with 400 grit sandpaper and finished with 800 grit sandpaper.

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I now cleaned the internals of the chamber, mortise and stem with EverClear, Q-tips, shank brushes and stiff soft pipe cleaning until the pipe cleaners came out as they went in.

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 With the old Finnish removed I re-stainded the stummel with dark brown Fiebing’s leather dye hitting with a lighter to set the set the stain. Now this is where I got over focused and did not take photos of my process. I removed the excess stain with an alcohol dampened rag and then sanded the high spots to lighten the stain, leaving the darker stain in the lower blasted areas of the stummel, wiping the stummel down with an alcohol dampened rag once more .

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I gave the stummel a coating of Howard’s butcher block conditioner before hitting the wheel, removing the excess with a clean rag.

Ready For IPSD

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Finished her up on the wheel with white diamond, a few coats of carnauba and a microfiber hand buffing. Buffing the stem with blue compound.

Now with a beautiful 54 degree February afternoon in N.Y. I’ll sit and enjoy my work and celebrate my wife’s birthday as well. Keep your chambers full and your hearts happy.
“May your matches always light and your tongue never bite”

My Daughters Pick, A Leather Covered LONGCHAMP OVAL BOWL

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Photo and Information Courtesy of Pipedia.
In 1948 Jean Cassegrain inherited a small shop near the French Theater on the Boulevard Poissonnière in Paris, called “Au Sultan”. Articles for smokers and fountain pens were offered there.
Now, the absolute bulk of the pipes Cassegrain found in the inventory was from war-time production and due to the sharp restrictions on pipe production the French government had enforced in 1940, these pipes were of very poor quality and showed large fills. Strictly speaking, they were not marketable now that the French pipe industry produced pipes of pre-war standards again. In this situation Cassegrain had the probably most enlightened moment in his life: he took some of these pipes to a leather worker who clad bowls and shanks in leather. Only the rims of the bowls and the shanks’ faces remained blank.
I like to get more bang for my buck, so I like to go after pipes listed in lots, keeping what I want and donating or selling off what doesn’t catch my eye. As the small flat rate box fills with extra pipes, I’ll take the box to my wife and daughter to see if anything catches their fancy. Usually it’s let em go to someone else but for some reason the leather-covered LONGCHAMP pipes my daughter found unique. She’s ten now and has taken an interest in some of my refurbishing projects. I have a few in my rotation that she wouldn’t let go, a red Color Duke by Dr.Grabow, a cheerywood Ropp and a BamBoo Briar.

 

Back Out Of The Box

 

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The pipe was in good shape, leather wrap was a little dry & dirty, worn button, deep tooth impressions, oxidation, rim darkening and brittle cake.

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A conventional reamer would not work with a ovel bowl, instead I started with 220 grit sandpaper and finished with 400 grit sandpaper.

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The internals were caked in old tars,oils and tobacco. I ran it though a retort using EverClear and cotton balls. I then did a thorough cleaning of the chamber, mortise and stem with EverClear, Q-tips and stiff /soft pipe cleaners. Cleaning until the last pipe cleaner came out as it went in.

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There were a few dings in the rim, using a household iron on medium/ high heat and a damp rag I would steam out the imperfections. Covering the rim with the damp rag and applying it to the hot iron working in intervals until the imperfections were almost gone.

 

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What was left of the imperfections and darkening, I removed with worn micro-mesh pads.

 

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The leather covering was dry and grimy. I busted out my wife’s leather cleaning products. I started with saddle soap to clean away the grease and grime, being careful not to get it into the chamber or mortise. I then switched to Doc Martin’s leather conditioner and finally ended with mink oil. The leather was now soft and supple.

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The oxidized stem, I applied a generous amount of non-bleach Soft Scrub to the stem with a children’s toothbrush and left it aside to penetrate the oxidation. Once the Soft Scrub turns from white to a brownish color its time to scrub vigorously with a rag until the oxidation is removed, finishing up with a damp Magic Eraser to remove the leftover oxidation.

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It was now time to address the tooth impressions, I first roughed up the area of repair with 400 grit sandpaper so my fill would have a good hold and then cleaning with EverClear to remove my sanding dust.

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To fill the deep impressions and rebuild the worn button I mixed thick black CA glue and activated charcoal power into a paste and applied it to the impressions/button using a toothpick. I then hit it with accelerator to set the repair, leaving it aside to cure overnight.

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Now that the repair had time to cure overnight, I could shape the new button. Using a flat needle file I removed the excess until I had an uniformed shape.

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Once the new button was at a suitable thickness I moved to 400 grit sandpaper to remove the file marks.

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Before hitting the micro-mesh, I re-touched the logo. I tried multiple applications Rub & Buff, White Out Pen and finally white nail polish, which was the winner.

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I then sanded the whole stem with 1000 grit sandpaper wet, then ran it though the various grits of micro-mesh pads, 1500-2400 wet and 3200-12000 dry. Stummel and stem complete she was now ready for the final buffing.

Complete.

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Finished up the rim on the wheel with white diamond, a few coats of carnauba and a microfiber hand buffing. I lightly buffed the leather covering with a clean buffing wheel. Buffing the stem with blue compound.

Thanks For Taking A Look.

 

Peterson Captain Pete XL80

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I was gifted this Captain Pete for Christmas by my wife its one that has pasted me by a few times and I didn't think I'd get in the shape I wanted the XL80, a shape I'm very found of.  The Captain Pete XL80 is chunky and has a shorter stem then the standard 80 shape and thats what was so eye catching for me, short and fat like many of the pipes in my collection. Jim Lilley connoisseur and collector of Peterson Pipes wrote a post on the Captain Pete on his blog, he has also contributed to Pipedia The Peterson Page , the Peterson's in his collection are amazing.
As Received
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The Captain was in was in decent shape when I received it, rim build up, tight tennon fit, a little chatter, worn stain and the start of an uneven cake.
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After looking over and disassembling the pipe, I set aside the stem and started with the stummel. First reaming the chamber with my Pipnet reamer starting with the smallest attachment and working up to the second attachment, smoothing things out with 400 grit sandpaper wrapped around a finger. The chamber was free of burn or pitting. Now my attention turned to the rim build up, I applied a generous amount of Method Wood For Good Polish with a Q-tip and allowed it to penetrate the oils and tars.
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After the Method Polish had time to penetrate the build it was easily removed with Q-tips. Some of the stain was removed along with the build up, which doesn't typically happen with Method polish.
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With the rim free of oils/tar I began my internal cleaning of the stem, chamber and mortise using EverClear, Q-tips, makeup pads and stiff/soft pipe cleaners, cleaning until the pipe cleaners came out as they went in.
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After my internal cleaning, I did a EverClear and cotton ball soak on the chamber allowing it to absorb the tars and oils while I worked on the stem.
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The stem was in good condition aside from a a little chatter and a couple of tooth impressions. To remove some of the shallow tooth chatter I heated the area with a Bic Lighter ( moving the flame at all times never leaving it in one spot too long) all but a couple of impressions raised.
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I now applied non-bleach Soft Scrub to the stem with a children's toothbrush and left it aside to penetrat the oxidation. Once the Soft Scrub turns from white to a brownish color its time to scrub vigorously with a rag until the oxidation is removed, removing the leftover oxidation with a damp Magic Eraser.
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The couple of tooth impressions that were left I would remove with 1000 grit sandpaper wet. I tapped off the bit/button portion of the stem with blue painters tape so my rough sanding would remain in one area.
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Before polishing the stem with the finial three Micro-Mesh pads I touched up the P with Rub'n Buff. I applied it with a Q-tip and buffed off the excess with a rag and continued with my final polishing with the last three micro-mesh pads.
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The  rest of the stem would not need as much work as the bit/button portion, as the Soft Scrub and Magic Eraser removed all the oxidation. I left the painters tape on the stem and  ran the button area though the various grits of sandpaper and micro-mesh 1500, 1800, 2000 paper, 2400 wet then 3200-4000 dry, I removed the painters tape just before sanding the entire stem with the last three Micro-Mesh pads 6000-12000 dry.
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Raising rim dents with steam. Using a household iron on medium/high heat and damp rag, I covered the rim dents with the damp rag and applied it to the hot iron working in intervals until all the dents raised.
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This is the first time I had results work this well and would not have to sand the area afterwords.
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When I received the Captain the red stain on the rim was faded to an almost pink color and after cleaning the debris from the rim it was more so. I decided to re-stain the whole stummel with Fiebings Red leather dye. I gave the stummel a wipe down with an alcohol dampened rag, allowing it to dry then appling the red stain, I hit it with a Bic Lighter to set the stain, removed the excess stain with a alcohol dampened rag and left it overnight to dry completely before buffing.
Captain Complete
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I Finished up on the wheel with white diamond, a few coats of carnauba and a microfiber hand buffing. Buffing the stem with blue compound and buffing the spacer with black emery before gluing it back in place.

 

I had fun taking photos of this one, My Pop was a Navy Man so I’m also a collector of vintage nautical item’s as well.

Thanks For Taking A Look.

A New Look For A Poker Made By Brian Doran

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I received this stubby poker made by Brian Doran for Christmas its a shape I’ve wanted for some time. I couldn’t find much information on the pipe maker, other then his EBAY actions. He’s from West Virginia and makes affordable pipes for the working man. My wife purchased the pipe as an estate from a separate seller it was listed as clean and ready to smoke. The pipe it self seemed it had more to offer.

 

The facelift

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The pipe was pretty clean but the chamber had cracks/pits that would need mud, the rim had a strange rustication done with a dremal tool. It had more potential it just had to be uncovered.

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I started by topping the bowl with 150, 220, 400 grit sandpaper then 1000 to finish the rim off. I uncovered imperfections in the wood, it seemed insects may have made there home here first. I was able to remove all but one on the rim, I’ll say it adds character.

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After topping the bowl I decided to sand the stummel with 1000 grit sandpaper to add a little depth in color. I restained the rim and stummel with a light brown touch up marker, allowing it to dry and removing the excess with a alcohol dampened makeup pad. The stummel and stem were now ready for a buff.

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Before hitting the wheel I wanted to address the chamber, I mix a batch of pipe mud to fill in the pits, using cigar ash and a little water and smoothing it around the chamber with my finger.

Complete

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Finished her up on the wheel with white diamond,  a few coats of carnauba and a microfiber hand buffing.

Kaywoodie HandMade

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I’m a sucker for a fat bottom and that’s exactly what we have here in the Kaywoodie Hand-Made Over-size line of pipes. They’re getting harder to find, so when one pops up I have to jump on it. My search for a chunky Kaywoodie lead me to this line of pipes and about a year ago I had the pleasure of refurbishing two, there thick walls and chunky shape not only make it comfortable in the hand but it produces a cool smoke.
As Received

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The nomenclature was lightly stamped or worn.

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Over all she was in nice condition and seemed well cared for. Heavy stem oxidation, chatter and a little rim tar&char.

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I started by reaming the chamber with my Pipnet reamer, first with the smallest attachment and working up to the third  taking it back to briar, the chamber was free of any imperfections. I smoothed out the chamber with 400 grit sandpaper. The rim, I applied a generous amount of Method Good For Wood Polish and set aside to penetrate the debris. Using Q-tips I removed the oils and tars from the rim.

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The char/rim darkening was removed with worn micro-mesh.Using EverClear, Q-tips and stiff/soft pipe cleaners I gave the mortise and chamber a quick once over to get out the loose debris. Now the soak, I unrolled a cotton ball, twisted it together to form a long swab and inserted it tightly into the mortise and filled the chamber with EverClear a quarter of the way. I allowed the swab to absorb the alcohol, then I filled the chamber with two cotton balls and added EverClear until the cotton balls were saturated. I left it aside to allow the cotton balls and alcohol to absorb the oils and tars.

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The stem was heavily oxidized and had quite a bit of chatter. I started first by appling Soft Scrub with a children’s toothbrush to the stem and left it to penetrate the oxidation. Once the Soft Scrub turns from white to a brownish color its time to start the vigorous scrubbing with a rag, I would repeat this process a few times to get the bulk of the oxidation off. To get the rest of stubborn oxidation I used heat. Heat can be your best friend or your worst enemy and doesn’t work on all stem materials.(Nylon & Acrylic stems do not respond the same and melt or burn, I have had success with ebonite swirled cumberland stems in the past) In this case I’m working with vulcanite which is more resilient and responds well to heat. I heated the oxidized portions of the stem with a Bic Lighter (moving the flame rapidly never leaving it in one spot too long) working carefully around the clover logo inserted in the stem, In the past I’ve had a few inserts on Kaywoodie and Dr. Grabow pipes pop out using this method of heat. At this time I heated the bit/button portion of the stem to raise some of the chatter.

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With the oxidation removed I could begin sanding.

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After giving the stummel time to sit to allow the cotton balls and EverClear to absorb the tars and oils I could do a good internal cleaning of the chamber,mortise and stem. Using cotton balls,Q-tips and stiff/soft pipe cleaners I cleaned the internals of the stummel and stem until the pipe cleaners came out as they went in.

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After removing the chatter with 1000 grit sandpaper there was still one indentation on the button that did not raise with heat and would need filling. I mixed a paste using thick black CA glue and activated charcoal power, I taped off the button area so the fill would remain in one spot. I applied the paste with a toothpick allowed it to set up a bit, then removed the painters tape and hit it with the accelerator, setting it aside to cure.

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After the fill had time to cure I began to form the new button with needle files and sandpaper. The stem could now be run though the various grits of micro-mesh.

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I ran the stem through the various grits of sandpaper and micro-mesh. 1000 grit sandpaper wet, 1500,1800, 2000, 2400 wet and 3200-12000 dry. There were a few pieces of metal or aluminum embedded in the rubber which tells me it was wartime  recycled rubber. You can see the embedded imperfections in my final photos. Tho not very noticeable.

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I gave the stummel a wipe down with Howard’s butcher block conditioner and let it penetrate for a few minutes hand buffing off the excess. She was now ready for the wheel.

Fin

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Finished up on the wheel with white diamond, a few coats of carnauba and a microfiber hand buffing, buffing the stem with blue compound & carnauba.